Friday, January 21, 2022

Cottage Built in 1905 Along Whittier Place

      Many changes greeted the citizens of Irvington in 1902. The community had been independent with its own town board and marshall for thirty-two years, but all of that changed in February when the city of Indianapolis annexed the suburb. The neighborhood would now receive city fire and police protection along with other benefits like sewers and sidewalks. In the summer of 1902, the city announced the extension of Whittier Place from Lowell Avenue to the corporation line. (later Pleasant Run Parkway) Within a few years, several families started building their dream homes along that small section of the street.    

334 North Whittier Place Connected to an Indiana Historian

        In the winter of 1905, members of the Cottman family obtained a building permit to construct a frame house at 334 North Whittier Place for Julia Cottman, the widowed mother of historian George S. Cottman. City directories indicate that she lived there until1907, but she later moved in with her son's family at 336 North Ritter Avenue. George S. Cottman was a writer and historian. In fact, he founded the Indiana Magazine of History in 1905. He later wrote books, pageants and essays while continuing to serve as the editor for his journal. He married Vida Tibbott, a former teacher whose family had deep roots in Irvington. Mrs. Cottman, who was much younger than her husband, was very involved in local women's clubs. She frequently hosted meetings in her home.

     After the elderly Julia Cottman moved in with her son, they rented her Whittier Place home to the Jenney family and then the Cottmans moved to the Seattle, Washington area in September of 1908, likely surprising many of their Hoosier friends. They did not remain gone for long as an Indianapolis News blurb announced that Vida Cottman returned one year later and moved into Julia Cottman's Whittier Place home in September of 1909. Mr. Cottman followed soon thereafter. The 1910 Federal Census indicates that George and Vida resided at the Whittier Place home along with their two-year old son, Evans and with 84-year-old Julia Cottman. Presumably, they didn't return to their Ritter Avenue address immediately because they had also rented that home out in their absence. By 1911, the Cottmans were back at 336 North Ritter Avenue. Their son, Evans, later wrote a short memoir about growing up in Irvington although he does not mention his brief tenure along Whittier Place. 

    

Members of the Hackleman family, who lived at 5438 Lowell Avenue, lined up with other neighborhood children for a parade c1910 in front of the Cottman home at 334 North Whittier Place. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon)

Grace Hackleman and Florence Hackleman rode their bikes while their sister, Gladys, posed in a nearby tree c1910. The Hacklemans resided at 5438 Lowell Avenue. Behind the girls, you can see the Cottman home located at 334 N. Whittier Place. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon) 

George S. Cottman was a prominent Indiana historian of the early twentieth century. He authored numerous books and pageants. The Cottmans briefly lived at 334 N. Whittier Place although they spent most of their Irvington years at 336 North Ritter Avenue. (photo courtesy of RayBoomhower.blogspot) 

George S. Cottman authored an early history of the state of Indiana in 1925. 

The Cottman home as photographed by Google in July of 2019


     I wish to thank Anne Gribble Spurgeon for the use of her incredible Conner/Hackleman photo collection. I also wish to thank Paula Schmidt and Steve Barnett at the Irvington Historical Society.

Irvington Historical Society

Sources: Opening of Whittier Place north of Lowell Avenue: Indianapolis Journal, August 19, 1902; Building permit and construction of Cottman home: Indianapolis Commercial, February 1905; Cottman Seattle move: Indianapolis Star, September 27, 1908, 18; Indianapolis News, September 25, 1909, 22;  

Saturday, January 8, 2022

Dennison-Davidson Home in the Early 20th Century

      The Hackleman children, who lived at 5438 Lowell Avenue, had plenty of playmates in the neighborhood. They must have been particularly excited when the Davidson family moved into 5428 Lowell Avenue because the children in that house were of similar ages. Photos from the Hackleman family collection reveal that the children frequently played next door.  

     We are still learning about the earliest history of the two-story Dutch Colonial Revival home, but we do know that Arthur E. Dennison purchased the lot for his future home at 5428 Lowell Avenue in September of 1903. By 1904, Dennison had moved into the house. City directories indicate that he was a landscape architect and the president of the Kant-Swag Gate Company. An ad in the Indianapolis Star in 1906 boasted that Mr. Dennison's farm gates were "bull strong" and would "last a lifetime and never sag." We do not know much about Mr. Dennison or his family yet, but he moved out in 1908 paving the way for Robert and Mary Galvin Davidson to buy the property in either 1908 or 1909. They remained for the next two decades. 

      Mr. Davidson was an attorney with an office in downtown Indianapolis. Mrs. Davidson stayed home and raised their children, Margaret, Katherine, Mary, and little Robert, who died at age two . The three older girls played with the three Hackleman girls. Photos revealed that they staged elaborate costume parties or perhaps plays. To learn more about the Davidson family, click on the link below the post. 


Neighborhood children enjoyed swinging in the front yard at 5438 Lowell Avenue c1911. Behind the girls, you can see the Dennison-Davidson home at 5428 Lowell Avenue. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon) 

Neighborhood children observed a calf at 5438 Lowell Avenue. Behind the girls, you can see the Dennison-Davidson home at 5428 Lowell Avenue. The photo is remarkable because if you look closely you can see the side of the large house at 5408 Lowell Avenue. That home has been gone for decades. (photo c1910 courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon) 

Neighborhood children posed with a pet calf and dog c1910 in the backyard at 5438 Lowell Avenue. Behind the girls, you can see the Dennison-Davidson home at 5428 Lowell Avenue. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon) 

Mary Galvin Davidson posed with her three daughters, Margaret, Katherine, and Mary c1910. The Davidsons lived at 5428 Lowell Avenue for many years. (photo courtesy of the descendants of the Davidson family via Ancestry.com) 

Members of the Davidson and Hackleman families and perhaps other neighborhood children gathered on the lawn for a costume party at 5428 Lowell Avenue c1914. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon)



Children in costumes posed on the lawn of 5428 Lowell Avenue c1914. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon)

A girl in a costume posed on the porch of the Dennison-Davidson home at 5428 Lowell Avenue c1914. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon) 

Children acted out a scene from "Princess Winsome" at the Dennison-Davidson home at 5428 Lowell Avenue on July 26, 1911. The Indianapolis News on page seven of that date identified the girl on the porch as Eunice Bickel.  (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon) 

     I would like to thank Anne Gribble Spurgeon for the generous use of her family archival collection. I would also like to thank Paula Schmidt and Steve Barnett at the Irvington Historical Society. 

Irvington Historical Society

Sources: Dennison era--Ad, Indianapolis Star, June 15, 1906, 2; Polk's Indianapolis City Directories, 1904-1908. 5408 Lowell Avenue--Larry Muncie, Irvington Album, Indianapolis, 1994, 50. Mr. Muncie published a 1912 photo of the house in his book. For information on the Davidson family, click on the link below. 


Tuesday, December 28, 2021

Photos Emerge of an Early House in Irvington

     While we still have much to learn, the Irvington Historical Society recently acquired two fascinating historic photographs that show the evolution and changes in the residence located at 116 South Audubon Road. A friend of the Society alerted a board member that the photos were on Ebay. We leapt into action and thankfully acquired the images. Here is what we know so far...

    The Reverend James Monroe Crawford and his wife Clarissa or Clara Golay Crawford employed an unknown architect and contractor to erect a two-story Second-Empire home with a tower along Central Avenue (later Audubon Road) in 1872. Like many men of his age, Mr. Crawford had side jobs including as a realtor and businessman. The couple had eight children although it appears that only five lived into adulthood.  Reverend Crawford, served as a chaplain during the Civil War, and later was the minister for the Sixth Presbyterian Church in Indianapolis. Like many of the early residents of the neighborhood, the Crawfords struggled financially after the economic Panic of 1873. Newspaper articles in the 1870s revealed their struggle including a bankruptcy in 1878. They moved out of Irvington in 1879 and into the Fletcher Place neighborhood before moving to Ohio and then California. 

      The 1880s are still a bit murky for us at the moment, but we do know that entrepreneur, Robert E. Moore and his wife Jessie Ann Harvey Moore, purchased the home in 1890. Mr. Moore constructed Moore's Hall next door in 1892 on the northwest corner of South Audubon Road and Bonna Avenue. At three stories, it was one of the tallest buildings in Irvington and housed businesses, offices, a lodge, and at least one Butler University fraternity. The Moores had six children and were very involved in the neighborhood. Mrs. Moore hosted numerous clubs, most of which were affiliated with Downey Avenue Christian Church. For reasons yet unknown, the couple decided to completely remodel the home around 1906. So far, we have found no evidence of a fire so perhaps they just wanted a more modern look. Maybe they needed more room. We do not know, but the transformation was a shocking one. The Moores changed the mansard roof in favor of a hipped one. They removed part of the tower and added dormers. They extended a front porch but kept a lower bay window. They also preserved the original nineteenth-century interior staircase. It was an astounding makeover. In fact, we had no idea until we saw these photographs that any of the original nineteenth-century house even remained, but it does! 

    After Mr. Moore's death in 1919, Mrs. Moore and her youngest son moved in with other family members in Irvington. Eventually the home was sold and was extensively remodeled for a third time. This time the historic home was converted into several apartments in 1924. Moore's Hall, located at Audubon Road and Bonna Avenue was razed by 1938. 

      We do not know why these two important images ended up in Michigan and eventually on Ebay, but we are happy that these important artifacts have come home. 


The Moore family purchased 116 South Audubon Road in 1890. On the back of the photo, someone has written, "the Robert Moore home before the remodeling." If the woman on the front porch is Mrs. Moore, then the young child would likely be Robert or Richard. That would date the photo somewhere between 1893 to 1897. If the boy is her youngest son, Joseph, then the photo would date to 1902. It is entirely possible that it is not Mrs. Moore on the front porch. Steve Barnett, the director of the Irvington Historical speculates that the photo could predate the Moore family. (photo courtesy of the Irvington Historical Society)

Robert and Jessie Moore dramatically changed the residence located at 116 South Audubon Road sometime around 1905. The boys in the photograph are most likely Richard and Joseph Moore. On the back of the photo, someone has written, "The Robert Moore home after the remodeling." Reed's Photographic Services on Alabama Street in Indianapolis was also stamped on the back. Steve Barnett, the director of the Irvington Historical Society, discovered that Reed's was in operation from 1904 until 1910. (photo courtesy of Irvington Historical Society) 

In 1924, the home located at 116 South Audubon Road underwent another significant transformation as it was turned into the "Sinaia" apartments. (photo take on December 21, 2021)


 


The original nineteenth-staircase (1872) still exists in the residence--now apartments--at 116 South Audubon Road. (photo taken on December 21, 2021)

The original family, the Crawfords, walked up and down this curved staircase at 116 South Audubon Road from 1872 until their departure in 1879. (photo taken on December 28, 2021)

The Crawford house appeared in the Real Estate Gazette in 1873 as a promotional for the new town of Irvington. (courtesy of the Irvington Historical Society) 

Robert E. Moore constructed Moore's Hall at 132 South Audubon Road in 1892. The three-story structure was demolished in the late 1930s. (photo courtesy of the Irvington Historical Society)

 I wish to thank Steve Barnett, the director of the Irvington Historical Society for his vast knowledge of all things Irvington. I would also like to thank Joan Hostetler, Deedee Davis, Jon Oliger, Paula Schmidt, Steve Schmidt, Don Flick, Paul Diebold, and Clay Daugherty.

Irvington Historical Society

Sources: Crawford family--financial issues--Indiana State Sentinel, July 29, 1875; Indiana State Sentinel,  July 31, 1878; Bankruptcy--Indianapolis News, September 9, 1878, 4; Minister--Indianapolis News,  February 12, 1870, 4; Indianapolis News, April 10, 1879; Indianapolis News,  August 16, 1880. 4; Moore family--"Funeral of Robert E. Moore," Indianapolis News, August 11, 1919, 3; Moore's Hall--"Irvington News," Indianapolis News, August 22, 1892, 2; Mrs. Moore--"The Irvington Woman's Club," Indianapolis News, August 9, 1904, 26; "Modern German Art," Indianapolis Star, February 27, 1910, 5; "New of the Churches," Indianapolis Star, June 28, 1911; "Social Side to Churches," Indianapolis News, February 7, 1917, 5; Apartment conversion--"116 S. Audubon Road," Indianapolis Star, May 20, 1924, 17.

Sunday, December 19, 2021

Wintry Scenes in Irvington Through the Decades

      One of the advantages of writing this blog for twelve years, is that I have amassed a database of beautiful winter imagery connected to Irvington. So far, snow has eluded the neighborhood in late 2021, but who knows what awaits us. If heavy snows arrive in 2022, then we will probably grab our cameras and rush outside much like folks have been doing through the ages. Some of these photos have been posted before but many have not. Happy holidays and thank you to all of you who have contributed photos over the years. 

     This post is dedicated to the memory of Robert Kistner, whose image is below. I met both Mr. Kistner and his daughter Elizabeth Bodi as they were traveling down memory lane in Irvington. He grew up by the Irving Circle Park so I instantly knew which photo I wanted to post of him.  Rest in peace, Mr. Kistner. 


The Lamb family resided at 5631 University Avenue from 1937 until 1961. This photo was likely snapped c1938 on a beautiful wintry day. (photo courtesy of Lynn Smith)

The Hackleman kids, who lived at 5438 Lowell Avenue, found time to play in the snow along North Whittier Place c1910. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon) 

Florence Hackleman, who lived at 5438 Lowell Avenue, posed with the family cow near the carriage house in her backyard on a winter's day c1912. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon)

A giant snow mound in the backyard at 5438 Lowell Avenue provided entertainment for the Hackleman children c1910. The home most visible in the image is located at 321 Whittier Place. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon) 

Florence Hackleman posed near her front porch at 5438 Lowell Avenue with her sled c1912 (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon) 

Albert and Rita Stone resided at 317 North Ritter Avenue from 1949 until 1954. Sometime during the early 1950s they sent this Christmas card to the Richardsons of 477 North Audubon Road. The family impressively already had a television set. (photo courtesy of Donn and Carolyn Richardson)


The Richardson family lived at 477 North Audubon Road and snapped this snowy image c1950 (photo courtesy of Donn and Carolyn Richardson)


Almost like a ghostly image, the Doan residence at 47 North Irvington Avenue was clearly covered in snow c1904. (photo courtesy of Jim and Ann Brown and the Indiana Album) 

On a wintry day, the Doan sisters of 47 North Irvington Avenue posed for a photograph. Behind the girls you can see the home located at 59 North Irvington Avenue. (photo courtesy of Jim and Ann Brown) 

Anne Warner posed in her front yard at 66 Johnson Avenue in 1954. Behind her you can also see the residences located at 58 and 54 Johnson Avenue. (photo courtesy of Steve Warner and Paul Diebold)


Wintry Scene 1954: A member of the Warner family snapped this photograph from the family home at 66 Johnson Avenue. To the left you can see the Irvington Presbyterian Church and across the street you will note the homes located in the 5600 block of Julian Avenue. (photo courtesy of Steve Warner and Paul Diebold) 

Robert Kistner (1934-2021) or "Bobby" as he was known in the photograph, posed for this image in his front yard at 263 South Audubon Road in 1937. Behind him you can see the Irving Circle Park. (photo courtesy of Robert Kistner and Elizabeth Bodi)

Bernard and Margaret Korbly purchased the Kendall home in 1915. They snapped this image of 425 North Audubon Road in the winter of 1920. (photo courtesy of Pat Dwyer)



Bike tracks lead to the Doran home at 5770 East Pleasant Run Parkway North Drive in the winter of 1951. (photo courtesy of Kevin Yamafuji)



Jim Burck shoveled his driveway at 6120 East 9th Street in 1943. Behind him, you can see the Ghere family home located at 6126 East 9th Street. (photo courtesy of Christina Burck) 

John, Della, and RoseAnn O'Connor posed after a snowstorm in 1957. The O'Connors resided at 5956 Beechwood Avenue. Behind the family you can see the bungalows located at 5952 and 5948 Beechwood Avenue. (photo courtesy of RoseAnn Linder)

Dr. John H. Booth and his son, George, listened to the radio in their home at 280 South Downey Avenue c1935. (photo courtesy of Mac Fife)

Dr. Clifton and Bonnie Applegate Donnell resided at 82 North Hawthorne Lane when this photo was snapped by a member of the Caldwell family in 1943.  (photo courtesy of Ginny Hingst)

The Schmidt home at 5702 Pleasant Run Parkway North Drive on a snowy day in 1938. The home was later renumbered as 5701 East St. Clair Street. (photo courtesy of Ann Schmidt Brown and Doreen McGuire Crenshaw) 

Time to sled! Dr. Henry Schmidt posed next to Beverly Spencer and Ann Schmidt on a winter day in 1938. The Schmidts resided at 5702 Pleasant Run Parkway North Drive and had a perfect hill for sledding. (photo courtesy of Ann Schmidt Brown and Doreen McGuire Crenshaw)



  Thank you to all who have contributed over the years! More vintage photos will be forthcoming. 


Thursday, December 16, 2021

Brown's Hill Was a Popular Sledding Site

     Newspaper publisher Hilton U. Brown and his wife Jennie Hannah Brown purchased five acres of land on the southwest corner of East Washington Street and Emerson Avenue in 1891 for $3500. Mr. Brown first heard about the opportunity from an Irvington realtor named Charles W. Brouse. The property came complete with a pioneer farmhouse previously owned by the Weesner and White families. Mr. Brown demolished that residence but used the hewn walnut and oak timbers for a barn that an Englishman named Hector Fuller constructed on the site. The Browns erected a large home on the site using boulders from the nearby Pleasant Run stream. The couple raised their ten children on the expansive grounds complete with an orchard and an ice house built into the hill near the stream. 
     Soon after the home was finished, the Browns allowed local children to sled down the hill. Mr. Brown did have rules for the children. They were not to quarrel nor to throw snowballs. Over the decades thousands of local children flocked to the site. Jean Brown Wagoner, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Brown and an author, noted in one of her newspaper columns that, "It made a fellow suck in his breath and then let out a yell as he started down." With the arrival of spring, the Browns frequently had to reseed the hill to keep it from being a muddy mess. 
    Over time, the Brown children moved out. Mrs. Brown died first, but Mr. Brown lived on until the age of 99. He passed away on September 20, 1958. His family sold the property to the Washington and Emerson Corporation shortly after his death. Several people in the neighborhood wondered what would become of the grand old place. Grace Booth Bay, in an Indianapolis News newspaper article, called for the home to be a senior home. She had grown up near the residence and remembered the boulders being put into place. Others hoped it would be turned into a museum. Some thought it might become a funeral home. On May 15, 1959, vandals broke into the empty house and broke windows, tore off a fireplace mantel, and littered the house with material they snatched from desk drawers. 
     Without public input, the community likely reacted with shock on June 24, 1959, as a crew began to demolish the beautiful home. The hill, however, remained for another ten years. Sledders continued to fly down the slope. Then, despite public opposition, including from Mayor Richard Lugar, the Indianapolis Board of Zoning Appeals (Division 2) allowed Howard Fieber, the President of Washington and Emerson Corporation, to flatten Brown's Hill for a filling station.  Today, the laughter and thrills from that incline linger on in memories and in photographs like those below. 

The Widner brothers, who lived on Farrington Avenue, enjoyed a slide down Brown's Hill c1962. Across the street, you can see the Forsyth family home at 15 South Emerson Avenue. William Forsyth was a renown-impressionistic artist. He purchased the house in 1908 from the Parker family, who predated the foundation of Irvington. Developers razed that home in 1966 or 1967 for a filling station. You can also see the double located at 25-27 South Emerson Avenue and the cottage next door at 29 South Emerson Avenue. (photo courtesy of Estate of Frank N. Widner)

This view of Brown's Hill was snapped in 1962 from the Forsyth property at 15 South Emerson Avenue. The Brown mansion had already been torn down, but the hill still existed on the southwest corner of East Washington Street and Emerson Avenue. It was later flattened for a filling station. (photo courtesy of Susan Forsyth Selby Sklar Collection at the Irvington Historical Society)

Hilton U. and Jennie Hannah Brown built their stunning home at 5087 East Washington Street on a hill in 1892 at the southwest corner of Washington and Emerson Avenue. It was demolished in 1959 and the hill was removed in 1969 for a filling station. This photo shows the home in a publication celebrating the fortieth anniversary of the neighborhood in 1912. (image courtesy of the Irvington Historical Society)

Robert Selby, the son-in-law of William and Alice Forsyth, painted this image of Brown's Hill. You can also see the Brown home in the painting. (photo courtesy of Irvington Historical Society) 



     I would like to thank members of the Widner family and Susan Forsyth Selby Sklar for their incredible photographs and Paula Schmidt, the archivist at the Irvington Historical Society. 

Sources:  Information about the construction of the Brown home and the rules for sledding on Brown's Hill--Hilton U. Brown, A Book of Memories, Old Swimmin' Hole Press, Greenfield, IN, pp 278-288; Jean Brown Wagoner, "Downhill All the Way," Indianapolis News, December 23, 1975, 13; Last years of the Brown home and hill--"Hilton U. Brown Home Sold, Indianapolis News, March 31, 1959, 15; Wayne Guthrie, "When Mary's Marry, It's a Grand Mix-up," Indianapolis News, April 15, 1959, 13; "Hilton U. Brown Home Entered by Vandals," Indianapolis Star, May 16, 1959, 4; "Landmark Passes," Indianapolis News, June 24, 1959, 23; Art Harris, "Brown's Snowy Hill May Lose its Slide," Indianapolis News, October 12, 1968, 1;  Wayne Guthrie, "Efforts to Save the Hill Laudable," Indianapolis News, February 6, 1969; "Saving Brown's Hill," Indianapolis News, April 21, 1969, 6; Letter to Editor, Mary Elizabeth Ramier, "Disenfranchised," Indianapolis News, June 9, 1969, 9; Information William Forsyth family--Rachel Berenson Perry, William J. Forsyth: The Life and Work of an Indiana Artist, Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2014. 

Wednesday, December 8, 2021

Family Life Along Lowell Avenue in the Early 20th Century

     William E.M. and Pearl Conner Hackleman moved into their beautiful home at 5438 Lowell Avenue in 1903. The residence was both a blend of the Queen Anne and Colonial Revival styles. Their four children, Florence, Grace, Edwin, and Gladys spent their early years in the house. Income from Mr. Hackleman's thriving religious music company allowed the children to enjoy the comforts of middle-class American life. All of the children graduated from high school and three of them later earned college degrees. The Hacklemans moved from the home in 1922 after nineteen years of living in Irvington. Their next home was located at 1201 North Alabama Street in the Old Northside neighborhood of Indianapolis. 


Gladys and Edwin Hackleman of 5438 Lowell Avenue teeter tottered in the side yard of their property c1911. You can also see a glimpse of 5442 Lowell Avenue. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon)

The sandbox in the backyard at 5438 Lowell Avenue also served as an arbor during the summer months. Gladys, Grace, and Edwin Hackleman posed for the photo c1910. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon)

Mary Jane Conner, the grandmother of the Hackleman children, enjoyed a game of croquet with her grandchildren in the side yard at 5438 Lowell Avenue c1910. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon)

Gladys and Edwin Hackleman played with miniature train cars on their front porch at 5438 Lowell Avenue c1910 (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon) 

The Hackleman children, Grace, Edwin (in the carriage), and Florence, posed in their backyard at 5438 Lowell Avenue c1907. Behind the children, you can see the carriage house and a residence located at 333 Whittier Place. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon)

Gladys and Edwin Hackleman posed with a wagon at 5438 Lowell avenue c1911 (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon)

Edwin Hackleman posed near his front porch at 5438 Lowell Avenue c1910. Behind him, you can see the side of 5442 Lowell Avenue. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon)

Little Gladys Hackleman sat for this snapshot on her front porch at 5438 Lowell Avenue c1910. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon) 

Gladys Hackleman walked with her baby doll and carriage c1911. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon) 

Gladys Hackleman drove her toy car in front of her home at 5438 Lowell Avenue c1911. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon) 

Florence and Gladys Hackleman stood near their front porch at 5438 Lowell Avenue c1910. Behind the kids, you can also see the residence located at 5442 Lowell Avenue. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon)

Edwin and Grace Hackleman posed with kittens on their front porch at 5438 Lowell Avenue c1907 (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon) 


Florence Hackleman pulled her siblings, Grace and Edwin and the family dog c1907. Behind the family, you can see the carriage house located at 5438 Lowell Avenue and a distant barn located behind 5428 Lowell Avenue. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon)

Edwin Hackleman beamed as he posed next to his tricycle near his front porch at 5438 Lowell Avenue c1909 (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon)

A large gathering of young girls met on the front porch at the Hackleman home at 5438 Lowell Avenue c1910. Behind the group you can also see the side of 5442 Lowell Avenue. Was this a birthday party? A Sunday School class? A Girl Scout meeting? We do not know. (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon)



5438 Lowell Avenue c1905 (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon)


The Hackleman siblings of 5438 Lowell Avenue (in birth order): Florence, Grace, Edwin, and Gladys c1910 (photo courtesy of Anne Gribble Spurgeon) 


    I would like to thank Anne Gribble Spurgeon for the use of her images and stories. She is the great grand daughter of William Edward Michael and Pearl Conner Hackleman and the granddaughter of Gladys Hackleman and Wayne Carson.